WORLD YOUTH DAY AND THE SDG: THE CONCEPT OF YOUTH INVESTMENT, PEACE AND SECURITY

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MIF ON INTERNATIONAL YOUTH DAY

Every year since 1999, the United Nations has continued to celebrate the youths all over the world. Eighteen years after, the youths have continued to gain increasing recognition as agents of change in the society – since they have very important roles to play in deterring and resolving conflicts, and are key constituents in ensuring the success of both peacekeeping and peace building efforts. Hence, their inclusion in the peace and security agenda of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development committed to fostering peaceful and inclusive societies and affirmed “Sustainable development cannot be realised without peace and security”. Goal 16 aims to ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels. The World Programme of Action for Youth, which provides a policy framework and practical guidelines to improve the situation of young people, also encourages “promoting the active involvement of youth in maintaining peace and security”.

For the purpose of achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development agenda, it is considerable to adopt a conventional definition of youth; assess the concept of youth investment and how it can ensure the success of both peacekeeping and peace building; as well as suggest ways the incentives tailored towards youth investment can make meaningful impact on them.

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M.I.F ON INTERNATIONAL YOUTH DAY

According to Wikipedia, The terms youth, teenager, kid, and young person are interchanged, often meaning the same thing, but they are occasionally differentiated. Youth can be referred to as the time of life when one is young. This involves childhood, and the time of life which is neither childhood nor adulthood, but rather somewhere in between fourteen and twenty-one years of age.

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989 defines a child as any human person who has not reached the age of eighteen years.

To bring home the definition, we shall adopt the definition of the African Youth Charter; that a youth is any human person who falls in the age bracket of fifteen and thirty-five. However, the task that lies before us should make us think in line with Robert Kennedy that, “the world demands the qualities of youth: not a time of life but a state of mind, a temper of the will, a quality of imagination, a predominance of courage over timidity, of the appetite for adventure over the life of ease”.

The concept of youth empowerment and youth investment are interchanged, often imply the same thing. On the contrary, youth empowerment is a form of political heart-buy of youths for continuity. Most African politicians and their governments have bastardized the concept and have used it to manoeuvre their immediate social environment. Many of them believe that empowerment mean to purchase and distribute either of, motorcycles, tricycles (popularly called “Keke” in Nigeria), wheelbarrows, hairdryers, Knapsack sprayers, and stipends in form of social transfer benefits, etc. In as much as this is a plus to the society, there are little or no evidence that the beneficiaries expressed any form of predominance of courage over timidity; developed a superior state of mind or have any quality imagination that can spur innovation to permanently lift them out of poverty. It is evident that many of the beneficiaries have no appetite for adventure as they are limited to what they know and do, and are hardly proud of their skills since they remain restless and agitated. They also develop high sense of entitlement and feel marginalized; believing that what they have received can only keep them surviving each moment and not living in each moment.

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MIF YOUTH AMBASSADOR FOR SDG16

The concept of youth investment sees beyond tenure. It is a concept that seeks to improve young people’s outcomes through better funding opportunities, programmes and initiatives that build the capability and resilience of young people so they have the skills and confidence to engage positively in, and contribute to, their societies. These outcomes support increased educational achievement, greater employability, improved health and less state intervention. The economic and social landscape of the world is rapidly changing with the developments in technology affecting the way we think, live and work, the young people forming about 70% of the African population need to acquire the digital, entrepreneurial and enterprise skills to be participate and contribute to the social and economic growth of their societies.

This concept has three key strategies: leadership development, volunteering and mentoring. These can be achieved little or no stress but with the political will power to grow the economy and sustain peace and security.

The following key components of the strategies includes; maximising scarce resources through collaborating with corporate, non-governmental, and other government organization, improving data collection and analysis to enable funding based on knowledge of what works and for which group of young people, a clear mission statement and continuous appraisal of outcomes, and targeting investment to where it will have the most impact.

Therefore, if we intentionally adopt these strategies, guided by its component; and ensuring accountability, integrity, and inclusiveness we can build and shape a peaceful and secured Africa.

Ugbabe Adagboyi Damian

Twitter@ugbabeD

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INTERNATIONAL YOUTH DAY! WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW #Youth4Peace #IYD #IYD2017 #YouthDay

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DEVELOPMENT SETTING:

In 1995, the world youth population—defined by the United Nations as the age cohort 15-24—is estimated to be 1.03 billion, or 18 per cent of the total world population. The majority of the world youth population (84 per cent in 1995) lives in developing countries. This figure is projected to increase to 89 per cent by 2025. The difficult circumstances that people experience in many developing countries are often even more
difficult for young people because of limited opportunities for education and training, viable employment and health and social services, and because of a growing incidence of
substance abuse and juvenile delinquency. Many developing countries are also experiencing unprecedented rates of rural-urban migration by young people.
Apart from the statistical definition of the term “youth” mentioned above, the meaning of the term “youth” varies in different societies around the world. Definitions of youth
have changed continuously in response to fluctuating political, economic and socio-cultural circumstances.

Young people in industrialised countries comprise a relatively smaller proportion of the total population because of generally lower birth rates and longer life expectancy. They comprise a social group that faces particular problems and uncertainties regarding its future, problems that relate in part to limited opportunities for appropriate employment. Young people in all countries are both a major human resource for development and key agents for social change,economic development and technological innovation. Their imagination, ideals, considerable energies and vision are essential for the continuing development of the societies in which they live. Thus, there is special need for new impetus to be given to the design and implementation of youth policies and programmes at all levels. The ways in which the challenges and potentials of young people are addressed by policy will influence current social and economic conditions and the well-being and livelihood of future generations.

STRATEGY AND POLICY SPECIFICS:

In 1965, in resolution 2037 (XX), the General Assembly endorsed the Declaration on the Promotion among Youth of the Ideals of Peace, Mutual Respect and Understanding
between Peoples. From 1965 to 1975, both the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council emphasised three basic themes in the field of youth: participation,
development and peace. The need for an international policy on youth was emphasised as well. In 1979, the General Assembly, by resolution 34/151, designated 1985
as International Youth Year: Participation, Development, Peace. In 1985, by resolution 40/14, the Assembly endorsed the guidelines for further planning and suitable followup
in the field of youth.

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M.I.F YOUTH AMBASSADOR ADVOCATING FOR SDG16

The guidelines are significant for their focus on young people as a broad category comprising various subgroups, rather than a single demographic entity.
They provide proposals for specific measures to address the needs of subgroups such as young people with disabilities, rural and urban youth and young women.
The themes identified by the General Assembly for International Youth Year: Participation, Development, Peace reflect a predominant concern of the international
community with distributive justice, popular participation and quality of life. These were reflected in the guidelines, and they represent overall themes of the World Programme
of Action for Youth to the Year 2000 and Beyond as well.

The Programme of Action also builds upon other, recent international instruments, including the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, adopted by the United
Nations Conference on Environment and Development, the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action adopted by the World Conference on Human Rights, the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the Copenhagen Declaration on Social Development and the Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social Development, and the Platform for Action adopted by the Fourth World Conference on Women.

The Programme of Action is drawn from these international instruments generally and specifically related to youth policies and programmes. The Programme of Action is
significant because it provides a cross-sectoral standard relating to both policy-making and programme design and delivery. It will serve as a model for integrated actions, at
all levels, to address more effectively problems experienced by young people in various conditions and to enhance their participation in society.

The Programme of Action is divided into three phases: The first phase focused on analysis and on drafting the Programme of Action and on its adoption by the General
Assembly at its fiftieth session, in 1995; the second phase is concerned with worldwide implementation of the Programme of Action to the year 2000; the third phase, covering
the period 2001 to 2010, will focus on further implementation and evaluation of progress made and obstacles encountered; it will suggest appropriate adjustments to long-term objectives and specific measures to improve the situation of young people in the societies in which they live.

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M.I.F YOUTH AMBASSADOR ADVOCATING FOR SDG16

 

Part 2: The Breakdown On International #YouthDay #IYD #youth4peace #YouthDay #IYD2017 #SDGs

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The United Nations has long recognised that the imagination, ideals and energies of young people are vital for the continuing development of the societies in which they live. The Member States of the United Nations acknowledged this in 1965 when they endorsed the Declaration on the Promotion among Youth of the Ideals of Peace, Mutual Respect and Understanding between Peoples. Two decades later, the United Nations General Assembly observed 1985 as the International Youth Year: Participation, Development and Peace. It drew international attention to the important role young
people play in the world, and, in particular, their potential contribution to development.
In 1995, on the tenth anniversary of International Youth Year, the United Nations strengthened its commitment to young people by directing the international community’s response to the challenges to youth into the next millennium. It did this by adopting an international strategy—the World Programme of Action for Youth to the Year 2000 and Beyond.

The World Programme of Action for Youth (WPAY) provides a policy framework and practical guidelines for national action and international support to improve the situation of young people. It contains proposals for action, aiming at fostering conditions
and mechanisms to promote improved well-being and livelihoods among young people.

The WPAY focuses in particular on measures to strengthen national capacities in the field of youth and to increase the quality and quantity of opportunities available to young people for full, effective and constructive participation in society.

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In its original form, the World Programme of Action for Youth outlined 10 priority areas to be addressed; however, at the ten-year review of the implementation of the World Programme of Action for Youth, Member States agreed to the addition of five additional issue areas. These were expanded upon in a Supplement, which was adopted in 2007.
Together these 15 issue areas and their related plans of action are what is understood to comprise the World Programme of Action for Youth, which guides policy and action in the area of youth development. This publication was prepared in response to numerous requests by youth non-governmental organisations, youth policy practitioners and young
people for a ready reference to the WPAY, its 15 priority areas and their corresponding proposals for action. It also includes the means for implementation at the national, regional and international levels.

The text of the World Programme of Action for
Youth is presented in this publication as it appears in United Nations resolutions 50/81 of 13 March 1996, in its annex containing the World Programme of Action for Youth to the Year 2000 and Beyond, and 62/126 of 5 February 2008, in its annex containing the Supplement to the WPAY (2007). World Programme of Action for Youth and the Guide to the Implementation of the World Programme of Action for Youth, as well as information on the work of the United Nations on youth issues, please visit the official website here: www.un.org/youth.

I.Y.D & S.D.Gs: The Need to mobilise youths energy and Bank on it Beyond #IYD2017

 

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Image Source: Youths ZA

The topic ‘Youth’ in any form is something that has long been discussed and written about. People still discuss and write about it and will continue to write about it since the potentials embedded in it cannot be over-emphasised. As I was thinking of what to write in commemoration of the forth coming INTERNATIONAL YOUTH DAY (IYD), the first thing that came to my mind was; What if all the energies and enthusiasm of youth are painstakingly harnessed towards development? What a great way to build a sustainable development agenda.

My experience as a volunteer in East Africa for the past three years has equipped me with knowledge and experience to share some thoughts on youths’ energy because with the growing number of young people in Africa and their determination to make positive changes, one will wonder why policy makers and governments in time past have not given it the needed attention until recently.

Several young leaders, students, professionals of age between 22-35 years within the East African region came together during the last week of the month of May for the Tanzania International Model United Nations (TIMUN2017) conference tagged ‘Creating Global active Youths in Diplomacy and Leadership’, to collectively share ideas into finding the problems and challenges facing youth development within the region. MUN is a United Nation simulation conference which is aimed at training young leaders in diplomacy and also to foster international cooperation for sustainable development.

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Image Source: UN

As a participant during the conference I was able to lend my voice on the problems and challenges faced by young people and I took special interest in the product ideas that could be applied to issues concerning quality and inclusive education for sustainable development. The conference observed that access to quality education, youth unemployment and political exclusion are major challenges facing the youths in developing countries. The challenges are enormous but if the youth energies and enthusiasm are properly mobilised can give us the answers we seek.

Tackling these challenges requires mobilising a whole lot of energies from all facet of life, from professional background and all ages because in an increasing connect and open world, the youths are showing an ever-growing interest and concerns in development related issues. According to the United Nation Economic Commission for Africa in its publication in march,2016 discovered that in Africa, over 70% of the urban population is young people under the age of 30 years, more than elsewhere, development can only be achieved by mobilising the youth’s energies and having an informed, strong and organised youths. A university Don at the University of Makerere once said “when youths are assisted to learn how to solve their own problems through need identification and sustained actions on their need, unrest and conflicts will be averted”. I strongly agree with him because for development to be sustainable it must be in an atmosphere of peace and security. Youth energy is key and therefore should be mobilised and channelled towards development.

Consequently, the level of development we seek involves supporting a new generation of young people, assisting and mobilising them in order to strengthen their abilities towards development which is far reaching and sustainable.

Article by Omajijohn

@omaji_john

 

UNFPA

UNECA

YUNA

 

All you need to Know this International Youth Day (I.Y.D) 2017 Part 1.

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Image Source: UN

The theme of International Youth Day 2017 is Youth Building Peace.

Since the adoption of Security Council Resolution 2250 in 2015, there is growing recognition that as agents of change, young people are critical actors in conflict prevention and sustaining peace. International Youth Day 2017 is dedicated to celebrating young people’s contributions to conflict prevention and transformation as well as inclusion, social justice, and sustainable peace.

The current generation of youth are the largest in history and young people often comprise the majority in countries marked by armed conflict or unrest, therefore considering the needs and aspirations of youth in matters of peace and security is a demographic imperative.

Another Security Council Resolution, Resolution 2282 (2016) recognizes that the scale and challenges of sustaining peace requires partnerships between stakeholders, including youth organizations. It also reaffirms the important role youth can play in deterring and resolving conflicts, and are key constituents in ensuring the success of both peacekeeping and peacebuilding efforts.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development committed to fostering peaceful and inclusive societies and affirmed that “[s]ustainable development cannot be realized without peace and security”. Goal 16 aims to ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels. The World Programme of Action for Youth, which provides a policy framework and practical guidelines to improve the situation of young people, also encourages “[p]romoting [the] active involvement of youth in maintaining peace and security”.

Young people’s inclusion in the peace and security agenda and in society more broadly, is key to building and sustaining peace. The process of social inclusion for youth, including participation in decision-making as well as access to quality education, health care and basic services promotes their role as active contributors to society and affords young people with opportunities to reach their potential and achieve their goals. When youth are excluded from political, economic and social spheres and processes, it can be a risk factor for violence and violent forms of conflict. Therefore, identifying and addressing the social exclusion of young people is a precondition for sustaining peace.

Commemorate International Youth Day 2017! Join us; learn more; organise!

The official commemorative event to celebrate International Youth Day at the United Nations Headquarters in New York will take place on Friday, 11 August 2017. To learn more about how you can participate in the event or watch it live, click here!

To organize your own event or activity, check out our toolkit of ideas here!

To add your event to our Map of Events click here!

To learn more about the issue of youth building peace, click here!

#SDGs: Youths as Drivers of Peace and Development as International Youth Day (I.Y.D) 2017 Approaches

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M.I.F YOUTH AMBASSADOR ADVOCATING FOR SDG 9.

Focus: United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: International Youth Day 2017

2017’s THEME: Youth Building Peace

The 2030 Agenda for sustainable development is committed to fostering peaceful and inclusive societies and affirmed that sustainable development cannot be realised without peace and security. It also endure a responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all level at all level. This is why The World Program of Action for Youth, provides a policy frame work and practical guidelines to improve the situation of young people and also promote active involvement of youth in maintaining peace and security.
As the “International Youth Day” (IYD) draw closer, it is very important we remind ourselves some important statistics.

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M.I.F YOUTH AMBASSADOR ADVOCATING FOR SDG14

According to the Global Youth Development Index, an initiative of the Commonwealth secretariat, the world youth population is at all-time high, at 1.8 billion people aged 15 to 29, yet the potential for “Generation Hope” to contribute to a happy, healthy and prosperous future for all could be dashed by widespread joblessness, unequal access to health care and education and political influence. The index also show that many counties are experiencing a “Youth bulge” with adolescent and young adults making up a third of the population. This statistics is a green light of ‘demographic dividend” as young people contribute towards economic growth and well-being.
My mind understands that youth form a unique set within the society. They are often considered one of the most vulnerable set within the social fabric, and also regarded as the greatest source of hope for the nation’s future. The 2030 agenda present a viable platform on which youth activeness can be measured. Even though the global goals does not specifically focus on youth, there are reasonable indicators within the SDGs measuring youth development. There are many questions that come to mind when one discusses the SDGs; how informed are the youths about the SDGs? Are there programs in place to get them informed? How well has this programs helped since the inception of the SDGs. A cursory look at Tanzania and its youths on this topic will help answer some of these questions but the focus now will be on how well informed are the Tanzanian youths about the SDGs.

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M.I.F YOUTH AMBASSADOR ADVOCATING FOR SDG16

According to the United Nation Association Tanzania, young people aged 15 – 35 years make up 34.7% of the total population. The youth wing of this association called YUNA with the help of the United Nation resident coordinator Mr. Alvaro Rodriquez has rolled out plans and programs to sensitise the youth on the need to take the information to the grassroots. These program among other things train SDGs ambassador with the aim of sending them to rural areas to increase the SDGs awareness. On the average, this programs has worked well so far but more work should be done in terms of penetration, coordination and follow-up activities. The truth is that there are lots of talks, seminars and workshops done and still ongoing but the actions and results are not commensurate. While the forums are steps to dialogue and set the ground, everyday actions are very much need to achieve the global agenda we are passionately pursuing. “I contribute to the SDGs via my volunteering service in Pemba Island teaching the global goals in schools, but there are so many things we all can do since possibilities are truly infinite.”
In conclusion, Africa and other developing nations should as a matter of urgency formulate policies and programs aimed at involving the youths actively to drive the global goals since the only way to fulfill our 2030 mission is strong determination and undeniable potentials embedded in young people.

Article by omajijohn (@omaji_John)
United nation association Tanzania
Global youth population index
Youth of united nation association

Intl-Youth-Day-02-ENGLISH-1

#SDGs: Youths as Drivers of Peace and Development as International Youth Day (I.Y.D) 2017 Approaches

IMG_5020

M.I.F YOUTH AMBASSADOR ADVOCATING FOR SDG 9.

Focus: United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: International Youth Day 2017

2017’s THEME: Youth Building Peace

The 2030 Agenda for sustainable development is committed to fostering peaceful and inclusive societies and affirmed that sustainable development cannot be realised without peace and security. It also endure a responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all level at all level. This is why The World Program of Action for Youth, provides a policy frame work and practical guidelines to improve the situation of young people and also promote active involvement of youth in maintaining peace and security.
As the “International Youth Day” (IYD) draw closer, it is very important we remind ourselves some important statistics.

IMG_5126

M.I.F YOUTH AMBASSADOR ADVOCATING FOR SDG14

According to the Global Youth Development Index, an initiative of the Commonwealth secretariat, the world youth population is at all-time high, at 1.8 billion people aged 15 to 29, yet the potential for “Generation Hope” to contribute to a happy, healthy and prosperous future for all could be dashed by widespread joblessness, unequal access to health care and education and political influence. The index also show that many counties are experiencing a “Youth bulge” with adolescent and young adults making up a third of the population. This statistics is a green light of ‘demographic dividend” as young people contribute towards economic growth and well-being.
My mind understands that youth form a unique set within the society. They are often considered one of the most vulnerable set within the social fabric, and also regarded as the greatest source of hope for the nation’s future. The 2030 agenda present a viable platform on which youth activeness can be measured. Even though the global goals does not specifically focus on youth, there are reasonable indicators within the SDGs measuring youth development. There are many questions that come to mind when one discusses the SDGs; how informed are the youths about the SDGs? Are there programs in place to get them informed? How well has this programs helped since the inception of the SDGs. A cursory look at Tanzania and its youths on this topic will help answer some of these questions but the focus now will be on how well informed are the Tanzanian youths about the SDGs.

IMG_5139

M.I.F YOUTH AMBASSADOR ADVOCATING FOR SDG16

According to the United Nation Association Tanzania, young people aged 15 – 35 years make up 34.7% of the total population. The youth wing of this association called YUNA with the help of the United Nation resident coordinator Mr. Alvaro Rodriquez has rolled out plans and programs to sensitise the youth on the need to take the information to the grassroots. These program among other things train SDGs ambassador with the aim of sending them to rural areas to increase the SDGs awareness. On the average, this programs has worked well so far but more work should be done in terms of penetration, coordination and follow-up activities. The truth is that there are lots of talks, seminars and workshops done and still ongoing but the actions and results are not commensurate. While the forums are steps to dialogue and set the ground, everyday actions are very much need to achieve the global agenda we are passionately pursuing. “I contribute to the SDGs via my volunteering service in Pemba Island teaching the global goals in schools, but there are so many things we all can do since possibilities are truly infinite.”
In conclusion, Africa and other developing nations should as a matter of urgency formulate policies and programs aimed at involving the youths actively to drive the global goals since the only way to fulfill our 2030 mission is strong determination and undeniable potentials embedded in young people.

Article by omajijohn (@omaji_John)
United nation association Tanzania
Global youth population index
Youth of united nation association

Intl-Youth-Day-02-ENGLISH-1